The scene in the train station where a young boy smiles at Cyclops and he smiles back was unplanned. The boy was a huge X-Men fan, and Cyclops was his favorite. The scene originally called for Cyclops to look at the train schedule, but according to Bryan Singer the boy could not stop smiling at James Marsden. Finally, during one shot, Marsden just looked back at him and smiled, much to the boy’s delight. Bryan Singer liked the idea so much, he kept it in the film


Edgar Wright with Simon Pegg, Kate Ashfield and Lucy Davis on the set of Shaun of the Dead (2004)

Edgar Wright with Simon Pegg, Kate Ashfield and Lucy Davis on the set of Shaun of the Dead (2004)

vegangains:

Always reblog Elle Woods in her “fuck men I’m gonna get a law degree” phase

vegangains:

Always reblog Elle Woods in her “fuck men I’m gonna get a law degree” phase

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN
By Andrew Wheeler
We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.
Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN

By Andrew Wheeler

We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.

Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.

READ MORE

bctheinternet:

Louis C.K. on slavery

michaelmidnight:

I WANT THESE BREAKING BAD FIGURINES

Created beautifully by Trevor and Troy Grove

Source:  Joe’s Daily

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.